Simple & Compound sentences - Orchids The International School
Job Alert : To view our Careers Page Click Here X
info@orchids.edu.in (+91) 8-888-888-999
ORCHIDS The International School

Types of Sentences

Simple & Compound Sentences for Class 3 English

Simple sentences teach us the proper way to communicate in English. Compound sentences allow us to abridge the sentence we write or say. In this chapter, students are introduced to types of sentences, definition with examples and common mistakes.

Students will learn the following from this concept:

  • Formation of simple and compound sentences.
  • Difference between Simple and Compound Sentences.
  • Rules pertaining to these sentences.

Each concept has been explained using examples, illustrations and mind maps. Students can evaluate their understanding by trying to solve the two sentences worksheet for class 3 given at the end of the page. Check with their solutions too that are available in PDF format.

What is a simple sentence?

A simple sentence has one complete idea, with one subject, a verb, and an object.

Example:

example for simple sentence

What is a compound sentence?

A compound sentence is created when two or more simple sentences are joined with a conjunction like ‘and’ or ‘but’ or ‘so’ or ‘because’.

Example:

example for compound sentence

Two simple sentences connected with the conjunction ‘but’.

Difference between Simple and Compound Sentences

Difference between Simple and Compound Sentences

Rules

  • Simple sentences must have a single independent clause. It has a subject, a verb, and an object. Example for Simple sentence
  • The simple sentence must not contain a dependent clause or another simple sentence.
  • A compound sentence must have two independent clauses.

    Example:

    Example for Compound sentence
  • A compound sentence is joined with a conjunction.

    Example:

    example of conjunction in compound sentence
  • Each part or clause of a compound sentence before and after the conjunction, is complete on its own.

    Example:

    example for compound sentence

Common Mistakes

  1. Forming a compound sentence without any connector. Two independent clauses have been formed but without any connector to join them. The long sentence has been fused together without a conjunction.

    Example:

    tick The man entered the home; quickly closed the door.
    tickThe man entered the home, and quickly closed the door.
    crossThe man entered the home quickly closed the door.

    Instead, you can use a semi-colon or conjunction with a comma.

  2. Forming a compound sentence only with a comma. Do not join two independent clauses only with a comma.

    Example:

    tick He waited for her to arrive, and then left for urgent work.
    cross He waited for her to arrive, then left for urgent work.

  3. If you avoid the first two types of errors, two independent clauses can be joined by using a coordinating conjunction (i.e., for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so).

    Example:

    tickThe man entered the home, and quickly closed the door.
    crossThe man entered the home and quickly closed the door.

    • You must use a comma before a conjunction that joins two independent clauses.
    • A comma indicates that parts of a sentence have an exact meaning. In the above example, there are two major parts, each of which has a specific meaning. A comma is required to denote where the first meaning ends and the second begins.
Simple and compound sentence anchor chart
  • -

    Admission Enquiry

    A Journey To A Better Future Begins With Us